Friday, July 3, 2020

August Eve / Lammas: August 6th, 2020


August Eve is a holiday celebrated between the summer solstice and the fall equinox, and is one of the major festivals on the Wheel of the Year.   It was pinned as a combination between the Gaelic festival Lughnasadh and the Gule of August or Lammastide commonly celebrated in Europe during Medieval times.  The Gaelic Lughnasadh celebrates Lugh, a sun and sky hero-god who presides over truth, law, skills, and crafts.  Lughnasadh included ritual athletic competitions, races, storytelling and drawing up laws and settling legal disputes.  Alternatively, Lammas marks the annual wheat harvest where it was said that any bread loaf baked that day would have magical and protective powers.  

Modern Neopagan celebrations tend to lean towards historical Lammas with hints of ancient Lughnasadh.  In combination with the fall equinox and Samhain, Lammas is the first of three harvest festivals that focus on the fruit of the land, reaping what we've sewn, and closure as we near the winter months.  The harvest thus becomes both a literal and symbolic activity of the holiday.  Modern practitioners make bread and corn on the cob, then use the wheat shafts and corn husks to create wicker men and cord dollies.  Common practices include the "sacrifice" of bad habits and negative emotions, the celebration of goals achieved or nearing completion, and the decoration of canning jars and gardening/farming tools.  What is it that we accomplished?  What do we need to let go?  Warding spells and banishing rituals are particularly important to this holiday as we enter the darker part of the year.

This year's August Eve occurs scientifically on Thursday, August 6th, 2020 at 8:04 PM CST.  Every year it shifts slightly, so I would suggest checking Archaeoastronomy.com if you're coming to this article after 2020.

Activities and Spells
Rituals

1 comment:

  1. I always refer to the calendar map on the site Archaeoastronomy.com, but I was wondering, why some other site, like google search, marks Lammas as the 1st of August? and why is it called August Eve? (shouldn't it be July 31st if it is August eve?

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